FORWARD BASE B

"Pay my troops no mind; they're just on a fact-finding mission."

The Leisure Economy

The market economy acts as a sort of spontaneous recombinant system that rapidly evolves possible solutions to problems.  New mutations arise en masse so for any lock you may encounter, you soon have the perfect key in hand.  With superhuman precision, the market decides on the perfect price for every good, down to the last fraction of a cent.  If there’s something people want, the market figures out a way to provide it as a river finds its way to the low ground no matter how many boulders lie in its path. 

The market is highly efficient because it harnesses the natural force of desire as mills harness wind and water with no further effort needed from man.

But there is a limit to the scope of the market’s power.  It can only work with existing components and cannot deal with excessive uncertainty.  Not to mention, that which deals in desires does not always give people what they really need to solve problems beyond basic material want.  Unpleasant truths and tough-but-necessary solutions tend not to sell well.  Nor can the market provide what desirers can’t imagine.

The religious devotion of modernity to the market obscures the understanding of other recombinant systems designed to solve different sorts of problems.  The biggest weakness of desire recombinance is that its function is linear and incremental.
If we are thirsty we want water.  Then we want a container to hold the water in…and so on.

The core shortcoming of powering a windmill with desire is that it’s as basic and elemental as tangible things, as common to animals as it is to people, lying near the bottom of the hierarchy of needs. 

The natural inquiry then is to ask how our windmill is powered as we move up the hierarchy of needs to its pinnacle of self-actualization that is unique to conscious beings.  We end up with something non-linear and exponential, the market of ideas where the main currency is not solid gold but ingots of free time.

Ancient Greek philosophers were not motivated by making money at jobs, nor were they really entrepeneurs.  Yet our present day society has no concept of a productive social role outside the market.

Plato had a school.  Pythagoras and Epicurus lived with bands of followers.  These groups provided for the philosopher’s material needs but they don’t seem to have been rich as we think of it.  Conspicuous leisure to develop the intellect without having to worry about money was itself the mark of natural aristocracy.
In fact, the philosophers looked down on thinkers and speakers who plied their craft primarily for profit.  These ‘sophists’ were criticized for caring about their clients rather than objective truth.  We can easily identify this same problem in our money economy thousands of years later.

This is why throughout history, societies that are poor in learned leisure fail to produce new ideas however wealthy they may be.
For thousands of years, there have been magnificent empires in China, India, and the Middle East yet it was paradoxically the comparatively barbarian fringe of Europe that reached critical mass and exploded with power and creativity like humanity has never seen.

A common pattern with peoples like the Chinese is they had no lack of ingenuity as can be seen with their inventions of gunpowder and the printing press.  
However, unless it was immediately useful in business or government the uses remained limited to low-hanging fruit.  There simply wasn’t the ripple effect of new, more sophisticated applications that we saw time and again with Europeans.
There was no space in their society for the meandering process of experimentation that has uncertain yields, if any.  In business and farming, no one can afford to consider any plan that doesn’t have consistent profits.

Societies that produce enduring ideas have in common a class of literate, educated, leisured people besides government scribes and bureaucrats.  So we might anticipate a successful future social structure will have a formal leisure economy.  Already, the internet overflows with the information and ideas of millions given to all of us for free.  Theories of capital gain have no way to navigate, or even describe this miraculous, seemingly altruistic terrain yet we’re all still stuck scraping for money.

7 responses to “The Leisure Economy

  1. Sorcerygod June 9, 2017 at 2:31 pm

    What do you think of Milton Friedman?

    • sunhater June 10, 2017 at 10:56 am

      Hey, I know you. You comment on Heartiste blog, mingling with the PUA alt right wannabes.

    • Giovanni Dannato June 10, 2017 at 10:12 pm

      Don’t know that much about him. A quick scan of wikipedia tells me he’s from the U Chicago crowd. Mixed feelings about them. That he predicted stagflation is worth further study. Not as bad as hard core Keynesians or libertarian Mises cucks. I limit my actual readings on economic thought because it’s mostly shilling for interest groups with lots of jargon. I mostly just observe economies in real life when I want to write on economics.

    • Sam J. June 12, 2017 at 12:08 am

      Milton Friedman=Jewish Libertardian. Ann Ryandian spoofer.

  2. Sam J. June 10, 2017 at 8:25 pm

    “…This is why throughout history, societies that are poor in learned leisure fail to produce new ideas however wealthy they may be.
    For thousands of years, there have been magnificent empires in China, India, and the Middle East yet it was paradoxically the comparatively barbarian fringe of Europe that reached critical mass and exploded with power and creativity like humanity has never seen.

    A common pattern with peoples like the Chinese is they had no lack of ingenuity as can be seen with their inventions of gunpowder and the printing press.
    However, unless it was immediately useful in business or government the uses remained limited to low-hanging fruit. There simply wasn’t the ripple effect of new, more sophisticated applications that we saw time and again with Europeans…”

    This reminds me of what could possibly be some sort of trend. I can’t say I can precisely categorize it or even explain it but it seems to be some sort of societal problem. The British after their empire fell are still an inventive people but they don’t seem to be able to capitalize on their inventors or inventions. I sort of see that, slightly, in the US. LCD’s screens were invented here and a lot of other stuff but they end up getting made in Asia.

    • Giovanni Dannato June 10, 2017 at 10:01 pm

      If you read some older posts, I have a model for this. Right mix of barbarous fire and civilized discipline = innovation. Civilization with its pressures for conformity uses populations up in about 1000 years at most.
      So we see innovation progress from the borderlands of the last collapsed civilization as a fire consumes the edges of a piece of paper. My worry is we’ll get eternal stagnation once there’s nowhere else to go.
      No requirement for progress, Aborigines were perfectly content with boomerangs for 10s of thousands of years. Native Tasmanians actually regressed.

    • Sam J. June 12, 2017 at 6:26 am

      Maybe this has something to do with it.(You may have already read this.)

      https://bloodyshovel.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/houellebecq-on-the-new-matriarchy/

      “…And so the modernity announced by Muray implies the comeback of the matriarchy, in a new form, formed by the state. So the state keeps the people in a perpetual state of infancy; and the first enemy that modern society attempts to crush is virility itself…”

      The Romans also made occupations hereditary so there were no surprises.

      One thing that really impressed me as SUPER significant is that the Romans passed no fault divorce just like the US and rapidly the whole damn thing fell apart. Men started refusing to get married and eventually they put a bachelor’s tax on them for not marrying. If that doesn’t sound like a Matriarchy I don’t know what is one.

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