FORWARD BASE B

"Pay my troops no mind; they're just on a fact-finding mission."

Tag Archives: soundtrack

Forward Base B: The Official Soundtrack

I started thinking about an appropriate background music to represent the contents of this blog, my personality, and my personal history and got to work on it.
After all, one commenter set the post I wrote the day before the election to heavy metal music.
The idea is to move towards establishing an aesthetic that gives people and intuitive feel beyond ideas alone.  I see myself as a post-Western barbarian with a culture and values of my own in an age of fracture, a dark age.  I’m not the smash things up kind of barbarian, at least not until the time is right and the rewards of doing so are sufficient and outweigh the risks.  Until then, I prefer to blend in and bide my time.  I can be very passionate but am also patient.  So I had to think about how I might convey that kind of mood and world view with existing music.

As a kid, I was an awkward bookworm that didn’t share interests with other kids and the pop music they loved became a soundtrack of their identity that I developed a strong aversion to. I came to feel viscerally that it was the music of the enemy plus it was repetitive and just didn’t stimulate me.  The only music I heard that really moved me was in movies.  Star Wars and Lawrence of Arabia were among my favorite soundtracks.  A turning point came in my early teens when I got a chance to see Phantom of the Opera.  Finally I heard music that celebrated darkness and a story that was driven by a secretive misanthrope who I identified with.  I had long known myself to be a shadow creature even back then.
From there, I started learning about classical music and never looked back.  I found composers I liked in each period, but I found I liked romantic era Slavic composers, French impressionists, and 20th century Soviet composers the best.
From studying history, I could well understand the stormy moodiness of Slavic music.  I identified with the cultural expressions of people who had always been surrounded by powerful enemies and for whom the fight for the right to survive was just daily life.  That’s how I had felt for as long as I could remember.  I could not relate to the superficially upbeat, carelessly optimistic American culture I had grown up in.
I also thrived on solitude and loved times of peace and contemplation.  This is where the French impressionists spoke to me better than anyone else.

It is raining as I write, just as I like it.  I love cold, grey, misty weather, the tap of raindrops and the whistling of cold winds on the windows with only a dim lamp on, a dark beer or a warming whiskey by my side and perhaps an aged cheese and/or dark chocolate on a small plate.  I count such slow times of leisure among the best joys of life.

Playlist can be put on shuffle if you go to the youtube site.  I also have a couple of other playlists for the fun of it, Silly Catchy and Epic Classic.  I am by the way, potentially open to recommendations for additions to any of these lists.

Somewhat unrelated: One of my favorite league of legends champions is Kassadin.  When you pick him, his line is “The balance of power must be preserved,” most appropriate.
He wanders another dimension called the void on his mission, again it works for me.
His strategy as an assassin champ(Shaco is also a favorite) is an exercise in controlled aggression.  If you jump in at the wrong time, you get vaporized, if you get it right, you can disrupt a fight, kill their highest damage squishy champs and turn the tide.  And with his teleport, he’s excellent for chasing them down when they try to flee.
In real life, I can spend weeks at a time in no hurry to do very much but spring into action when I see something I think will be a decisive objective.  I like thinking decades ahead and often about after I’m dead.  I watch worker bees emotionally investing in jobs where no one really cares about them in the long run and wonder what motivates such loyalty.  If I am to imagine myself as an animal, I used to think a falcon or a crow.  But over time, I’ve come to see myself more like a vulture or a moray eel.  I like to think I am strategically lazy in imitation of the ways of the natural world.

kassadin

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