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High School And Status in America

Conventional wisdom tells us that we leave behind high school for adult life, a moral impressed on us with the bittersweet ending of every teen movie.  If we observe the real-life American culture it’s obvious that high school informs our attitudes about status for the rest of our lives.

After Charlottesville, one mainstream news article I read surmised “angry white boys…had no prom queen waiting at home.”  On the dissident side we see the meme of the Chad nationalist contrasted with the hapless virgin or the general idea of the teacher’s pet “shitlib” getting shoved into lockers by cool bullies and still being bitter about it as a hot-chocolate-sipping, pajama-wearing adult.  No matter what people believe, we always see references to the jailhouse hierarchy of high school.

There is a reason high school ridicule is as reliable a default as “small penis,” “can’t get a gf,” “lives in mother’s basement” is for angry women.  These insults endure because they are intended to hit people where it hurts most.  There are millions of men to whom the feminist stock insults at least partially apply in the most humiliating way.  High school is the same.  It speaks for itself that the most tender possible spot for many people is to even suggest that they were bottom-tier punks in kid prison.

Coming of age in high school teaches us at a critical formative time that the most athletic and outgoing people are the natural aristocracy of humanity, literally crowned as monarchs in school assemblies held in their honor.  The whole point is the elites are not particularly useful, specializing in showmanship and sales.  The golden people perform on the field while the subordinate bug people line up to adore them in a synchronized marching band.
Status competition in a royal court is all about currying favor while those merely useful are but tools in the games of those who matter.

This sets up the narrative that defines the rest of our lives.  We must accept our places as cogs in a machine to uplift widely smiling “personalities” secure in their status while we must push hard against the gears around us to stay where we’re at.

The football players get to enjoy sultry virgins as callow teens while those who go sexless spend the rest of their lives striving for the left-overs as cubicle-farm underlings.  While the golden ones start out with society’s highest rewards, the rest must prove themselves worthy of diminished value through a years-long slog.

Resentment of the jocks plays no small role in kneejerk upper middle class resentment of Donald Trump.  He reminds them of crass school bullies who scored with their first crushes—a source of panic and pain their cultural enemies love rubbing their faces in to pay them back richly for their airs of studied contempt.

We should understand though, SWPL posturing is so persistent and insufferable because of status anxiety.  As the urban upper middle class, they far outrank the working classes yet they still stew in rankling jealousy.  Rather than take up the mantle of noblesse oblige as a secure lesser aristocracy might, they never miss a chance to dump their chamber pots on their low-ranked brethren.

High school inflicts Americans with a bizarre status schizophrenia.  On one hand, the culture feeds us a silly myth that the quarterback ends up bagging groceries while the unpopular kids become Silicon Valley billionaires.  Of course, this is an attempt to assuage the losers, much like religions telling the poor they’ll finally win after they’re dead.  In real life even highly paid STEM professionals can end up getting ordered around by Biff Tannen who got into the right fraternity and got connected with type A alums.  While SWPL America is relatively high status, they are smug and callous about it because they sense somewhere deep in their marrow that all is not as it appears.

Another status conflict can be seen in hostile alt-lite reactions to alt-right activism.  The most popular elements of the counter-culture see popularity itself as proof of their worthiness just as they would have back in high school.  We will never fail to see grand boasts of how many copies of x book have been sold or how many views they get or what publications they’ve been mentioned in.  The culture of high school is akin to culture of marketing and this is no mistake.

High school reflects the values of the merchant and managerial classes who have ruled since they beheaded, deposed, and out-earned the hereditary aristocracy.
This makes it hard for most to even grasp the concept of groups founded on principle and loyalty.  After all, standing on principle against popular sentiment in prison only gets met with a beatdown in the shower room.  It’s not much different at school or on the job.

This mindset is now being challenged by an incipient warrior class supported by an aspiring priesthood.  Dissident merchants are doing their part but they don’t yet understand they can no longer lead the hierarchy.  This is causing them cognitive dissonance every step of the way as the nature of the movement grows more clear.  Marketers who can attract millions of views have great strategic strength but their weakness is that of all those millions, hardly any would risk their lives or reputations.  At some point, meaningful action requires serious personal risk and sacrifice.

It is past time to abandon the dysfunctional zero sum non-culture high school initiates us into for a real society capable of giving the best rewards to the best and able to recognize virtues besides marketplace self-interest.  If Euro-descended peoples ultimately fail to face this challenge, they will have justly earned a cozy spot on the trash heap of history.

See Also:
Vincent Law: Chad Nationalism Is A Bad Idea
Robert Stark Interviews Vincent Law
Ulric Kerensky: The Judgment of High School
Abolishing Compulsory Schooling
Referred to National Review Story, Angry White Boys, don’t want to link to them.

 

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