FORWARD BASE B

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Tag Archives: employment

The Decline of the Traditional Job

The original Luddites were quick to grasp the long term implications of the industrial revolution as they saw their living vanish overnight.

The ‘job’ as generations from the 19th century onward have known it has gradually been decreasing in importance and reliability.

We’ve tried reducing to 40 hour work weeks, we use schools to keep young people off the job market for years.
We’ve adopted a truly Keynesian economy that devotes most of its efforts to useless pyramids and intangibles rather than producing concrete things, if only to keep people occupied and keep wealth in circulation.

Yet we’ve reached a point where even these measures are failing to create a job market that can distribute wealth enough to create a stable society.

I cannot help but conclude that we are approaching an age of small scale entrepreneurship because that’s how increasingly more people are going to have to make their money. In some ways it is actually an age of opportunity where more people will be free agents rather than hirelings. And perhaps society will actually benefit from vast numbers of useless pyramid builders being freed up to do things that actually yield a net positive effect.

If the payoff from scarce jobs does not outweigh the inconvenience and strain of being lorded over by bosses, alternatives become more attractive.

An initial consideration for finding a solid source of wealth, a viable business concept.

Does it have an economic “moat” that makes it difficult for competitors to challenge you or can anyone set up shop overnight?

Here’s a rundown of the types of economic moats.

Supervillains and ‘Losers’

or So You Think You’re Part of ‘Society’

For some time now, a certain segment of an internet counterculture, especially in the manosphere have started cheering for the villains.

Villains are the epitome of the anti-social, the outsider. While the villain may have a certain audacity and strength the audience can admire, he’s also supposed to have certain flaws that cause us to totally reject his cause and ultimately despise him.

Yet what happens when millions of young men are effectively invisible outsiders?

Does the villain still seem like such a bad guy?

To begin to answer these questions:

What makes a young man part of society?
What does society owe a young man, if anything in order to gain his commitment?

We might look at historical standards to get some kind of answer to these questions.

To have a place:

A man must have at least an ongoing apprenticeship into a trade(some prospect of a career) and at least betrothal by the time he is 18 years of age.

And this is an extreme proposition. By age 18, a young man has already endured 4-5 long years of endless sexual frustration and many grueling years of training.
Nearly any long-lived culture has made sure its invested young men have had some kind of outlet long before this point.
Where is our typical ‘modern’ young man at age 18, the age of adulthood, the age beyond which he should be productive and contributing as an adult?

He has no ‘real’ job, no prospect of a job, no concrete job skills, no prospect of children or marriage, no meaningful direction from adults about how to make any of these things happen.

Everyone tells him he must get more training, invest more years of his life and then ‘society’ will welcome him into its ranks.

Grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts, ‘friends’….they give a patronizing pat on the shoulder and say their variations of the same thing.
“It will all work out.”

Years pass, achievements are achieved but no future, no membership into ‘society’ materializes.

The future offers void upon void.

A less young man turns to family and authority figures. “It will all work out.” they say.

So the man now presses onwards, still not knowing towards what, if anything.

One day a demon sits with him in the small room he lives in on his sub-subsistence income.

That demon gives him the first honest conversation he’s ever heard.

“You actually fell for all of it!” The demon giggles. “Don’t you realize! Everything you’ve ever been told is a lie! They will all keep telling you the same thing even as your hair turns gray! Do you think they are really on your side? Do they really care about you?”

The young man stares mutely and dumbly at the sinister shadow that sits across from him. The demon continues:

“Young men are a dime a dozen. Not all of them can be ‘winners.’ Don’t you know that!? The attrition of young men is just how biology, how ‘society’ works! Those people who are supposed to help you: they will gladly tell you ‘everything is all right’ even as the last fading opportunities in life slip by. Subconsciously, some part of them knows you are just more meat being fed into Darwin’s grinder. After all, ‘society’ is for women and the 1/5 of men women actually want. You’re kidding yourself if you think you’re actually a member of this society. You’re on your own.”

With that last, the demon vanishes.

The man wants to forget what he heard and dismiss it as nonsense. But he can’t. It tortures him by day and in his dreams. He swings back and forth between despair and rage.

Perhaps he’s heard of the Mormon polygamists who exile their “lost boys” into our larger ‘society’. Where then does this ‘society’ send its “lost boys?” His mind is blank at this question. That blank is his life.

This is a beginning to what some have come to call: “taking the red pill.”

Implications of Corporate ‘Personality Tests’ Used For Hiring

“our culture is undoubtedly headed in a direction where it will become its phoniest ever. In today’s job market, ‘truth’ has become an inconvenience, something that only gets in the way of our financial survival. But ‘truth’ is, always has been and always will be the most important thing to preserve, even if it makes life a tad more financially insecure.”

Personality Tests: Survival of the Phoniest

AND

“The truly scary thing is that this employment science is still in its infancy. In the near future, could certain personality profiles find themselves unemployable?

If lots of companies use the same hiring software, could they assemble a profile on someone based on multiple applications they’ve submitted?
Thus maybe someone could be disqualified based on inconsistencies in how they answer the personality test?

This brings up final questions. If a history of inconsistencies or unprofitable traits emerged on someone’s profile, could they end up essentially blacklisted through the entire system? ”

7 Reasons Why Unicru is Here To Stay

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