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A Creative Culture Requires A Leisured Elite

Trying new things is a luxury.  A wild animal that tries to play with its default script probably ends up dead.  Human societies, though, are actually required to try new things or else a more inventive society outcompetes them.  How a society manages its creative output is a matter of existential importance.

The greatest breakthroughs and masterpieces have always come from those who can labor at their work without distraction and who have significant creative freedom.
The ancient world produced works of genius that still stand out today.
This is completely astonishing when we consider that population size, wealth, and the distribution and storage of information were pathetic compared to now.
Surely the works of Ancient Greece ought to compare to our own as petroglyphs compare to Renaissance painting.  This may hold true if we consider technology, but not in the realm of culture and creativity.  Even when we consider technology, it’s amazing what they could accomplish with limited knowledge and resources.  Amazingly, much of what we have now is merely derivative of what the Greeks had 2500 years ago.

If we look at the creativity of societies in the past, one thing we must notice is that the creators weren’t ordinary people who worked on philosophy or poetry after a day in the fields.
Without exception, the people who produced the best and highest culture came from a small but leisured and insulated class of individuals.
For most of history, 90%+ of people were subsistence farmer peasants, yet so long as even a tiny fraction of 1% had the freedom to be professional creators, it was enough to create enduring culture.

Modern American culture idolizes the myth of someone who can work full time, take night classes, raise a family, and write the next great novel all at once. Thousands of years of human experience, however, tells us that the highest quality creative work requires complete devotion just like any other discipline.

There are of course professional creative people today—far more by numbers and proportion than there ever were in previous societies. There’s a big difference though. Modern creators are still paid workers.

The most creative people in older societies were invariably allowed to live free from the concerns of the market economy. They belonged to a leisured, aristocratic class that would have seen such affiliations as vulgar, even if they lived an ascetic lifestyle. They understood that if you depend on the next paycheck you can’t say what you really think. You have to give your audience what it wants right now or else you’re broke.
When it comes to modern creative talents people throw around the words “authentic” and “sellout.” These distinctions are an illusion when everyone lives in the market economy. Everyone is a sellout when everyone has to sell themselves.
This conflict of interest ensures that great creative work is scarce when everyone is busy earning a living. The market will produce plenty of what sells right now, but precious little anyone cares about 100 or 1000 years from now.
The market knows only the present, so a high quality creative class requires some degree of insulation from its caprices.
In the past, most advancement came from the few people who didn’t have to worry about wealth. Even where they did not have talent themselves, they might become patrons. Patrons were not really the same as employers because they were not directly trying to turn a profit. Moreover, patrons were a single person whom an artist could reason with. Artists like Michelangelo and Leonardo both negotiated with their patrons in the middle of the creative process and had some measure of control.
There is no arguing with market demand. The many wants what it wants right now. So when the market prevails we will never see epic works that take half a lifetime to produce, nor works that don’t ape today’s popular taste. Worst of all, the market forces creative people to answer to the masses.

In the past, the few professional creative people were protected by forming tight knit peer groups.
Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle represented three generations of master and apprentice, each of them supported in leisure by their society within a school of their making.  We might also consider that Pythagoras or Epicurus thrived as well within their own tribe of students.
In the past, ascetics and mystics formed another sort of leisured aristocracy.  Consider Diogenes who lived on public charity, or that the very name ‘dervish’ originally means a beggar,  or the experiences of John the Baptist, Jesus, any number of saints in the wilderness.   Across the planet, societies that nurtured their mystics have developed lasting spiritual traditions.
Even consider how modern science and education was largely pioneered by monks who had the rare leisure to study and question within the protected environment provided by the clergy.
A universal market economy, though, by its nature has no place for such “low productivity” slow growing endeavors.

Consider how the Romanticist poets all knew each other, most all of them from leisured aristocratic backgrounds.
Tolkien and C.S. Lewis knew each other, both academics with tenure at a university that still had a strong aristocratic tradition.
Robert E. Howard and H.P. Lovecraft profited richly from corresponding though both suffered terribly from being trapped in the market economy.  It speaks volumes that like their spiritual predecessor, Edgar Allen Poe, they had to sacrifice themselves to create enduring work.   Imagine what they could have accomplished had they been leisured aristocrats.
One small group of creative peers who needn’t fear for money are a more powerful force than an entire modern hive cluster of hundreds of millions where everyone is slave to money.
Constant busyness at pointless jobs is one of the biggest drains of productivity, the slayer of creativity in a population. The overworked do not tolerate idle creativity in others. Like-minded people are the substrate on which the individual grows. Just as guerilla insurgents cannot survive without a sympathetic population to harbor them.

Not long ago, societies could only afford to have a tiny number of people trying new things. But like efficient bodies honed by evolution, they made the small amounts of energy they spent on their R and D departments count so they were not subsumed by their competitors.
Now with greater modern wealth, we may do well to observe the successful practices of leaner times and apply them on a larger scale.

See also: Smart Socialism,
How the Middle Class Used to Be Affordable

6 responses to “A Creative Culture Requires A Leisured Elite

  1. Pingback: A Creative Culture Requires A Leisured Elite | Neoreactive

  2. Pingback: This Week in Reaction (2015/11/08) | The Reactivity Place

  3. stonerwithaboner January 18, 2016 at 4:42 am

    What’s up Mr. Dannato…

    I saw the trackback to your old blog, it is interesting because allot of the so-called MGTOW’s seem to be “libertarian”-when in fact allot of what is presented as “libertarianism” is really traditionalism and works against the best interests of low-status bachelor men. When I tried to suggest that things like a guaranteed minimum income might be helpful those crybabies cried communist/socialist….

    Yes, as technology progresses, wages should be higher and people should be able to work less hours but that is not what we are seeing…

    https://stonerwithaboner.wordpress.com/2015/08/03/i-believe-that-libertarianismand-mgtow-will-ultimately-be-incompatible/

    • Giovanni Dannato January 19, 2016 at 9:05 pm

      Oh, Hard Hemphead, been awhile since we crossed paths.

      For all his morbid cynicism “dirty diablo” was one of the more level headed guys out there, not getting caught up in the crazes. He’s mostly stopped posting except for porn now, but he had a great run.

      Some of the reasons you point out is why WNs remain a niche audience even where many people agree with some of their ideas. They come across as angry douches and ordinary guys recognize that the traditional system, not only can’t be resurrected, it might well hurt them.
      Imagine going back to not being able to marry or even get laid until you get enough property and prestige to impress her parents.

      The people you’re talking about I call “free market” libertarians. They’re a joke. They just want to get out of paying taxes and get rid of any rules that stop them from screwing over other people, fancying that they would be the ones to come out on top in a free-for-all. You’re right that it may be better just to call yourself something other than libertarian.

      You seem to identify somewhat as an anarcho-libertarian. However, you clearly believe that certain strong state programs such as guaranteed income would be beneficial and may become necessary.

      I would guess you don’t completely subscribe to any -ism, and try for a synthesis of ideas that produces the best outcome without being constrained by dogma.
      In a word, you’re “sensible.”
      After all what is the point of productivity and abundance if people don’t benefit from it?

  4. stonerwithaboner January 18, 2016 at 4:50 am

    did you see the interview where George Lucas compares Disney to white slavers?

    I only mention that because he discusses art vs. commerce and how filmmakers are beholden to shareholders just like any other business…

    Interestingly enough, he said that Soviet filmmakers had more freedom because so long as they didn’t critique the government they could make all kinds of movies without worrying about profit…

    • sunhater January 19, 2016 at 6:02 am

      Fascinating this Soviet / American comparison on creative liberties, I wasn’t aware of that.
      I remember your blog from back then when Chateau Heartiste was just Roissy & Roosh didn’t go “full retard”.

      You, Erudite Knight & Giovanni Dannato are some of the few “MGTOW” / anti-establishment blogger who remained intellectually honest.

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