FORWARD BASE B

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Does the Decline Make Statistical Sense? Does the American Way Make Financial Sense?

The American economy is worth 15 trillion, still over twice as big in absolute terms as a distant 2nd place, China a desperately poor nation with a huge population…
But is that wealth proportionally useful compared to other places?
If we consider GDP by purchasing power parity, China with many times more people still has only 75% as much relative wealth as the US.

The US national debt has passed 100% of GDP but the US remains one of the worlds most reliable debtors: 2% of GDP, 7-8% of Federal Revenue more than pays off all the
interest each year.  The federal government spends 4x as much each on social programs and the military!
The American debt burden would not impress struggling European powers during the Napoleonic wars.
Nations like Japan are far worse off with close to 150% GNP in national debt or Greece at 200%. Germany isn’t that much better off at 85%

The net US trade deficit is by far the largest in the world at about 450 billion, but another 30-40 billion a year of exports could plug the gap and the difference still pales in comparison next to the massive size of the US economy.

The numbers tell us that the US is a monster, yet those of us who live there are experiencing relentless and accelerating decline.  How do we explain this against awe inspiring numbers?
After all even a US in relative decline is still surpassed only by the entire EU.

Here’s some reflections on reconciling the reality on the ground with the statistics?

Virgin Bride: Unbuyable

Wife: Average income just an entry ticket to the arena

Girlfriend: Average income just an entry ticket.

Job Security: Unbuyable

House: At least $200,000 (realistically far more paid after interest, no one can afford that out of pocket)

Car: At least $10,000 if new. (realistically far more paid after interest, no one can afford that out of pocket)

Rent: At least $600/month, $7200/year even in cheap areas after utilities and fees.

Education: 16 years to satisfy basic prerequisites, consuming at least 6 years from age able to enter workforce. Possibly more than a decade with higher degrees. A doctor or successful lawyer may earn a lot but has to compensate for 10+ years of working part time or not at all. Filling a big black hole of years of tuition + living expenses.

Children, Family Before Age 30: The price is a life of grinding poverty.

How much just to break even?  A couple million dollars earned over a couple of decades? Even if everything goes as planned, break even by middle age?

The simple truth that stares us in the face: The “normal” lifestyle with house/apartment, car, job doesn’t make financial sense.
It entails a huge expenditures of time and energy in a desperate bid to break even.
In the past, people may have had prospect of having a family and securing their genetic futures, but now even this basic reward(readily available to many poor peoples all over the world) is elusive.

Just a glimpse at these basic expenses shows us that rent seeking, fees, tuition, royalties, interest on assets and payments is where wealth can actually be made.

Right now what keeps people going? Fear that the only alternative to the “break even track” is to live in true uncertainty of survival.

The United States remains fantastically wealthy on paper yet is the average person’s life essentially any different than the average across time and place?

Is someone in a poorer country who can hope for a genetic future in their reproductive prime, surrounded by supportive family, with an ancestral home to live in, a family trade to aspire to, in fact, better off?

Are Americans as atomized individuals a whole that’s less than the sum of its parts?
Are Americans despite their unprecedented wealth undermined by backwards and wasteful social institutions and culture?

Or is the present trend of declinism as the numbers suggest, a misguided fad?

Insights on this matter?

4 responses to “Does the Decline Make Statistical Sense? Does the American Way Make Financial Sense?

  1. stonerwithaboner August 28, 2013 at 6:33 am

    I find it amazing that worker productivity increases as wages stagnate…

    This is clearly unsustainable…

    Some are hording their wealth but when America is left impoverished, well, I suppose the Indians and Chinese can become the new middle class…

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/100949800

    hehe…

    just imagine in a few years, all us MGTOW’s will be trying to marry Chinese or Indian women to improve our lot in life. Truly the reverse dowry and a strange, ironic victory for feminism as we run away from American women even faster….

  2. AAB August 29, 2013 at 1:41 pm

    “Insights on this matter?”
    Shine the spotlight to the physical part of the economy instead of hte monetary part. The US still has a large maufacturing industry that can produce the tools for the economic growth it needs. Just like a Blacksmiths produces the tools for all the farmers, carpenters, builders etc in the village, regardless of how much ‘paper money’ the village does or doesn’t have. The economy may be up the creek in monetary terms but it’s in better shape physically than it was 100 years ago. All of those factories and civil engineering projects count for something. Focus on the parts that are controllable rather than the parts that aren’t.

  3. Eric Patton September 1, 2013 at 9:30 pm

    Half the debt is internally owned, this allows us to structure it to make it easier to manage.

    The US quality of life varies greatly from individual to individual and from state to state. We’re #3 on the HDI (it doesn’t measure virgin brides though):
    http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/countries/profiles/USA.html

    But the specifics vary heavily from state to state. We still hold most of the top spots on the Shanghai ranking for US universities, though the student loan debt can be difficult for many people to grapple with.

    As for differences between now and any other time in history, they are great and many.

  4. drewa November 14, 2013 at 8:10 am

    I don’t understand the need to constantly measure ourselves against other people in our own country and then against foreign peoples and countries. It really is statistics gone wild. The most successful people in any city, town, country are the ones that measure themselves against their last success or failure. In other words they live the life they create by their own measure.
    If we are ever to succeed as a people whether the USA continues on or not, it is by creating a life measured by our own version of happiness, it is a fact that civilizations only burn bright for around 300 years total. Then a new civilization will be created, whether that new civilization is on the same soil or not is immaterial to the fact that in order to be a better civilization than the last one, the people in the new “era” must work to create a better way of life based on their own last best measure of happiness. It is time for change in America, but the change we are being shown is
    not the change that anyone with insight would want. We the 305 million people of the USA can as one huge mass move into a change that benefits us all with the freedom we were all born with, to create a better society one we can be proud of. I am not proud of the direction we have allowed ourselves to be lead into, this country that was once a proud beacon of hope around the world is now an embarrassment, for it is a militarized death culture, it will not last but it is truly the dark ages and not a time of enlightenment. However we can turn the tide toward enlightenment if we speak and act as one voice. How we act, shop (the dollars we spend speak with a loud voice) , how we educate our children and defend our rights daily is how we control the direction of this country. The time is now to take responsibility for our own words and actions, for our health,
    finances and families, never forget that no body cares about you as much as you do.,

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