FORWARD BASE B

"Pay my troops no mind; they're just on a fact-finding mission."

Open Source Intelligence Analysis – We NSA Now

Working Thoughts:

1. Wikileaks can act as a secondary database. What we’ve seen so far makes it clear that most of the classified material is common knowledge but it could be useful.
2. Robert Steele is right that the humanitarian goodwill approach is superior. We’ve spent a lot of money in Afghanistan, but most of it was spent in unpopulated areas that were safe, the people who needed it didn’t get it. Lots of corruption. A tighter approach could be made.
3. Fiverr and penpal sites can also be useful for general cultural understanding or simple local tasks, e.g. : http://fiverr.com/worryfustion/help-you-learn-about-the-ethnic-groups-in-vietnam

http://fiverr.com/vann97/answer-10-questions-in-great-details-about-vietnam
4. Nearly all current prediction markets operate as zero-sum or negative-sum markets.


More OSINT Links:

“Dradis is a self-contained web application that provides a centralised repository of information to keep track of what has been done so far, and what is still ahead.”

http://dradisframework.org/

Links for OSINT (Open Source Intelligence) by Randolph Hock
http://www.onstrat.com/osint/

City Data:
http://www.city-data.com/

Public Records:
http://publicrecords.onlinesearches.com/

Name/Location Search Engine:
https://pipl.com/

“creepy is an application that allows you to gather geolocation related information about users from social networking platforms and image hosting services. The information is presented in a map inside the application where all the retrieved data is shown accompanied with relevant information (i.e. what was posted from that specific location) to provide context to the presentation.”
http://ilektrojohn.github.com/creepy/

Here is a recent example that uses the Palantir platform and OSINT:

Less than four months ago, the Southern portion of Sudan seceded and formed South Sudan, only the 5th country to be created this century. In this session, we will demonstrate how Palantir can draw from a plethora of Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) data sources (including academic research, blogs, news media, NGO reports and United Nations studies) to rapidly construct an understanding of the conflict underlying this somewhat anomalous 21st Century event. Using a suite of Palantir Helpers developed for OSINT analysis, the video performs relational, temporal, statistical, geospatial, and social network analysis of over a dozen open sources of data.

See also:

Detecting Emergent Conflicts through Web Mining and Visualization

https://www.recordedfuture.com/assets/Detecting-Emergent-Conflicts-through-Web-Mining-and-Visualization.pdf

&

Maltego

http://www.paterva.com/web6/

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