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Links On Test Cheating In China

China’s system, while rigorous, opens itself up to cheating by excessive focus on memorization and attrition. I’d prefer something closer to the Finnish system, though that one has faults of it’s own. Very little of their education or political system is preparing them to be able to innovate, the current system may drive out innovators into freer countries with a higher average quality of life, similar to what European scientists have been doing.

http://factsanddetails.com/china.php?itemid=2250&catid=13&subcatid=82

In a survey of 900 college students by the China Youth Daily released in 2008, 80 percent of those polled admitted to cheating on exams. Organized cheating rings have been uncovered. Students in Guangdong Province were caught using two-way radios to communicate during the exams.

Cheating is common in secondary schools, universities and in society as a whole. Andrew Jacobs, wrote in the New York Times, “Many educators say the culture of cheating takes root in high school, where the competition for slots in the country’s best colleges is unrelenting and high marks on standardized tests are the most important criterion for admission. Ghost-written essays and test questions can be bought. So, too, can a hired gun test taker who will assume the student’s identity for the grueling two-day college entrance exam.” [Source: Andrew Jacobs, New York Times, October 6, 2010]

Cheating appears to be not that big of a deal among students. Arthur Lu, an engineering student who last spring graduated from Tsinghua University, one of China’s top universities, told the New York Times it was common for students to swap test answers or plagiarize essays from one another. “Perhaps it’s a cultural difference but there is nothing bad or embarrassing about it,” said Lu, who is working on a master’s degree at Stanford University. “It’s not that students can’t do the work. They just see it as a way of saving time.” [Ibid]

http://isteve.blogspot.com/2012/02/chinese-cheating.html

There are now 57,000 Chinese undergraduates at American universities, as my colleague Tamar Lewin reports. Five years ago, there were just 10,000. And top private universities in the United States now have freshman classes with 15 percent foreign students or more.

… Many Chinese families hire agents to help them navigate the applications process, and an agent’s fee can range up to $10,000, plus an equally large bonus if the student gets into a school highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report, the QS rankings and the so-called Shanghai List.

From the survey’s introduction: “Our research indicates that 90 percent of recommendation letters are fake, 70 percent of essays are not written by the applicant, and 50 percent of high school transcripts are falsified.’’

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/china-news/students-cheating-in-schools-in-china-reach-all-time-high-43786.html

Take the case of the exam administered last year in Songyuan, a small town in Northeast China’s Jilin Province where systematic, almost public cheating used high-tech methods that have been favored in recent years.

According to investigative reporting by the China Youth newspaper, in Songyuan the equipment students used to cheat with was sold at 5,000 yuan (US$747), and the transfer of exam answers was sold separately, at 16,000–40,000 yuan (US$2,391–$5,978), with the final cost depending on how high the resulting scores were.

Prior to the exam, ads for “exam devices” were posted in public places in town, and two teachers were involved in selling the devices, making 800,000 yuan (US$119,572) in a few days. Exam candidates received phone calls to their homes just like telemarketing calls.

Also in Songyuan, old-style copying was taken to a new height. The student who was cheating would pay another student to copy his or her exams; the monitoring teachers were often paid as well. The cost of one exam can range from 3,000 to 50,000 yuan (US$448–$7473).

Monitoring teachers do not dare interfere fearing the students will retaliate. In 2008, a monitoring teacher in Songyuan was beaten up by a student’s parents for enforcing exam rules.

Also in Songyuan, old-style copying was taken to a new height. The student who was cheating would pay another student to copy his or her exams; the monitoring teachers were often paid as well. The cost of one exam can range from 3,000 to 50,000 yuan (US$448–$7473).

Monitoring teachers do not dare interfere fearing the students will retaliate. In 2008, a monitoring teacher in Songyuan was beaten up by a student’s parents for enforcing exam rules.

One response to “Links On Test Cheating In China

  1. Pingback: Daily Linkage – July 15, 2012 | The Second Estate

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